Crying. Starting with Crying Girl, Roy Lichtenstein, 1964

Crying Girl Roy Lichtenstein 1964 Pop Art enamel steel 116.8 x 116.8 cm Located at: Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin, USA
Crying Girl, Roy Lichtenstein, 1964
Pop Art, enamel, steel
116.8 x 116.8 cm
Located at: Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin, USA
Secret Hearts, no. 88 (June 1963), DC Comics
Secret Hearts, no. 88 (June 1963), DC Comics

In the early 1960s, Lichtenstein produced several “fantasy drama” paintings of women in love affairs with domineering men causing women to be miserable. These works served as prelude to 1964 paintings of innocent “girls next door” in a variety of tenuous emotional states. Picasso’s depictions of weeping women may have influenced Lichtenstein to produce portrayals of vulnerable teary-eyed women.

The porcelain enamel on steel Crying Girl was adapted from the 1963 comic strip panel: Secret Hearts, no. 88 (June 1963) by DC Comics.
via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crying_Girl

A sometimes uncontrollable human emotion, sadness may be eternal for humanity. Until we are able to separate ourselves from our human nature, we may be stuck with it. If you could, would you rid yourself of your human limitations? Keep in mind, without sadness, its opposite would not exist. 

Finding inspiration from Lichtenstein’s Crying Girl, I now welcome a small survey of weeping figures that can be found in art history.

Weeping Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1937 oil on canvas 60 x 49 cm Located at: Tate Gallery in Liverpool
Crying Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1937
Surrealism, Neoclassicist & Surrealist Period, Cubism
oil on canvas
60 x 49 cm
Located at: Tate Gallery in Liverpool
Crying Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1937 Naïve Art (Primitivism), Neoclassicist & Surrealist Period 55 x 46 cm
Crying Woman, Pablo Picasso, 1937
Naïve Art (Primitivism), Neoclassicist & Surrealist Period
55 x 46 cm
The Cry, Oswaldo Guayasamin, 1983 b. 1919 Quito, Ecuador d. 1999 Baltimore, US Expressionism
The Cry, Oswaldo Guayasamin, 1983
b. 1919 Quito, Ecuador
d. 1999 Baltimore, US
Expressionism
Theme & Variations Decorative Plate #77 (Crying Face) Piero Fornasetti, Italian b. 1913 Milan, Italy d. 1988 Milan, Italy Surrealism, Kitsch painting, sculpture, engraving
Theme & Variations Decorative Plate #77 (Crying Face)
Piero Fornasetti, Italian
b. 1913 Milan, Italy
d. 1988 Milan, Italy
Surrealism, Kitsch
painting, sculpture, engraving
Schoolgirl Crying, Charles Blackman b. 1928 Sydney, Australia
Schoolgirl Crying, Charles Blackman
b. 1928 Sydney, Australia
The Sick Child, Edvard Munch, 1885-86 Expressionism canvas 120 x 118.5 cm Located at: National Gallery, Oslo Munch had a troubled familial past. In addition to his overbearing pietist father, his mother died of tuberculosis when he was a small child, and his sister died nine years later of the same disease. This painting is an image of Munch’s older and favorite sister Sophie lying in bed, dying of tuberculosis when she was 15 years old. Munch created many reproductions of this painting, including one that was held in Dresden, Germany. In the 1930’s and 40’s Nazi’s deemed Munch’s art as “degenerate art” and removed all of them from Germany to be sold at auction. This piece was bought and later donated to the Tate Gallery in London, where it remains today. via http://www.wikiart.org/en/edvard-munch/the-sick-child-1886
The Sick Child, Edvard Munch, 1885-86
Expressionism
canvas
120 x 118.5 cm
Located at: National Gallery, Oslo
Munch had a troubled familial past. In addition to his overbearing pietist father, his mother died of tuberculosis when he was a small child, and his sister died nine years later of the same disease. This painting is an image of Munch’s older and favorite sister Sophie lying in bed, dying of tuberculosis when she was 15 years old. Munch created many reproductions of this painting, including one that was held in Dresden, Germany. In the 1930’s and 40’s Nazi’s deemed Munch’s art as “degenerate art” and removed all of them from Germany to be sold at auction. This piece was bought and later donated to the Tate Gallery in London, where it remains today.
via http://www.wikiart.org/en/edvard-munch/the-sick-child-1886
Mater Dolorosa, Workshop of Dieric Bouts, c. 1470–75 36.8 x 27.8 cm Located at: National Gallery, London
Mater Dolorosa, Workshop of Dieric Bouts, c. 1470–75
36.8 x 27.8 cm
Located at: National Gallery, London
Inconsolable Grief, Ivan Kramskoy, 1884 b. 1837. d. 1887 Russian Realism, oil on canvas Located at: Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia
Inconsolable Grief, Ivan Kramskoy, 1884
b. 1837. d. 1887
Russian
Realism, oil on canvas
Located at: Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia
The First Mourning, 1888 oil on canvas 252 x 203 cm Located at: Museu Nacional de Bellas Artes William-Adolphe Bouguereau b. 1825 La Rochelle, France d. 1905 La Rochelle, France French Realism, Neoclassicism
The First Mourning, 1888
oil on canvas
252 x 203 cm
Located at: Museu Nacional de Bellas Artes
William-Adolphe Bouguereau
b. 1825 La Rochelle, France
d. 1905 La Rochelle, France
French
Realism, Neoclassicism
Mourning, Umberto Boccioni, 1910 b. 1882 Reggio Calabri, Italy d. 1916 Verona, Italy Italian Futurism, Divisionism, Symbolic Painting Milan Futurist Group, Lacerba
Mourning, Umberto Boccioni, 1910
b. 1882 Reggio Calabri, Italy
d. 1916 Verona, Italy
Italian
Futurism, Divisionism, Symbolic Painting
Milan Futurist Group, Lacerba
Crying. Starting with Crying Girl, Roy Lichtenstein, 1964

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